New Work, introducing Surrey Medieval Middle English Field-Names Week

I’ve resolved to spend the first few months of this new year (belated happy it, btw) trying to complete several unfinished pieces of work which have been hanging around for months, in many cases years. My first accomplishment in this regard is that I’ve uploaded a tweaked version of the handout that accompanied my March 2014 talk to the Puttenham and Wanborough History Society on the subject of the place- and field-names of Puttenham parish. In fact, it comes in the form of two separate documents – read them both here. One down, still too many to count to go…

Large arable feld on the Hog's Back north-west of Puttenham village, formerly known as Further Common Downs (the clump of beech trees to left of centre is coterminous with an open field strip, a remarkable survival)

Large arable feld on the Hog’s Back north-west of Puttenham village, formerly known as Further Common Downs (the clump of beech trees to left of centre is coterminous with an open field strip, a remarkable survival)

Revisiting this particular piece of work came at a good time, since a few weeks previously I made a relevant discovery which kickstarted my taking a new look at the three earliest recorded field-names in Puttenham parish. Found in a text dating from the 1330s, you’ll find them quoted but not etymologised in the handout linked above. Duly I found my interpretations of all three names had advanced to a point at which I thought they merited detailed exposition, but what would be the best way of presenting my analyses?

Back in the summer of 2013, I wrote a series of posts under the umbrella of Surrey Medieval Stats Week. Like the election of Pope Francis and the Harlem Shake, you may remember it from the wall-to-wall coverage in the press and on social media at the time. Well, building on SMSW’s success, I’m going to repeat the trick with *drum roll* Surrey Medieval Middle English Field-Names Week (hashtag #SMMEFNW, go crazy and get it trending). Over the coming seven days, I’lll post accounts of each of the three field-names and how they fit into the wider context of Middle English language and naming practices. It should be good. Better than the acronym, anyway.

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About Robert J S Briggs

Back to being a part-time early medievalist; Surrey born, London based, been known to travel
This entry was posted in Agriculture, Being organised, Landscape, Place-Names, Puttenham, Talk, Topography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to New Work, introducing Surrey Medieval Middle English Field-Names Week

  1. Pingback: It’s Surrey Medieval’s Puttenham Church Week! An introduction to the parish church of St John Baptist | Surrey Medieval

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