Things you find when you’re bored at work

Despite several indications to the contrary, I do not indulge in the vice of Googling myself. Much. I do, on the other hand, make occasional searches for things I have written about. “Seven ditches” is a case in point; as I have mentioned previously, it led to my discovery that I had been cited as a reference in a Wikipedia entry (hopefully I will get around to writing up the second half of my findings in the next few days). Well, it now turns out that this may not have been the first time someone had thought sufficient of my work to make reference to it in a Wiki entry. As far back as December 2009, my debut contribution to the Surrey Archaeological Society’s Bulletin was added to the entry for “Frithuwold of Chertsey” (inadvisedly changed from Frithuwald – see his PASE entry for justification in using this latter spelling). Not quite sure what the wider relevance of this is, but (1) it’s a good overview of Surrey’s Mercian subregulus, and (2) it’s nice to be recognised – thanks Angus McLellan!

I then discovered something much more exciting: that my three Fullingadich/Frithuwald/Freoricburna-related articles from the Bulletin, along with the responses and offshoots from them penned by other historians, are all listed in the ‘Bibliography for 2008’ in volume 38 of the prestigious journal Anglo-Saxon England (published 2009). True it includes a zillion different other things by almost as many authors, but stuff I’ve authored is now listed there in perpetuity for researchers anywhere in the world with the patience to sift through 123 pages to see (to make life easy for you, my bits appear on pages 291, 297 and 307). What is more, anyone can follow this up by accessing the electronic back copies page on the SyAS website. If only I could get a proper article published in Anglo-Saxon England, now that would be something…

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About Robert J S Briggs

Back to being a part-time early medievalist; Surrey born, London based, been known to travel
This entry was posted in Anglo-Saxon, Charters, internet, Surrey. Bookmark the permalink.

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